The MacLamity

The News That Stays News, Reported Live

Thursday, July 27, 2006

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The Most Trenchant Wall Street Analysis Ever

There was a time when this was all anyone talked about

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When you're at these actors' age the funniest part of the movie is having a condom in your hand.

Wednesday, July 05, 2006

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Quote of the day: "'You know that penny farthing hell you call your mind? That's where you think this is coming from, don't you?' " Samuel Beckett

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Peter Stothard points out how saying Homer is a woman is not necessarily a feminist claim. Or rather, that Samuel Butler staked the claim for misogynist reasons.

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Peter Stothard points out how saying Homer is a woman is not necessarily a feminist claim. Or rather, that Samuel Butler staked the claim for misogynist reasons.

Tuesday, July 04, 2006

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Which author called his cat Kiddleywinkempoops? The answer will amaze you. His dog never knew his luck. Imagine what the Kiddleywinkempoops Regionalist Party would stand for.

Monday, July 03, 2006

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Like the Beatles, it's not just that Orwell produced more than his competitors did, in less time, of greater quality, his B-sides and rarities sustain the interest in them: "It may look like the sweepings from his study floor - memos to a literary editor about early deadlines, a photo of Orwell milking a goat in Morocco - but I found it gripping. "

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Social difficulties of the method acting: "One time [Robert de Niro] picked up a guy who happened to be an actor. The guy was like, 'Jesus Christ, one year you're winning an Oscar and now your driving cabs? Guess it's hard to find a steady job?' Bob explained what he was doing. The guy just put a hand on his shoulder and said, 'It's okay Bobby, I've been there too.'"

Friday, June 30, 2006

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Bern Porter "contributed to the invention of television, worked on the Manhattan Project and the Saturn V rocket, and made the acquaintances of Einstein, Oppenheimer, and Werner von Braun. He published Henry Miller, Kenneth Patchen, and Kenneth Rexroth, among others, and knew Gertrude Stein, Anaïs Nin, Allen Ginsberg, and many others you might name. He exerted a profound influence on the phenomenon known as mail art, traveled hundreds of thousands of miles on cruise ships, was married three times (once happily), spent several years in Guam, was an irascible crank, theorized a union of art and science called Sciart, was briefly committed to a mental institution, wrote more than 80 books including important bibliographies of Miller and F. Scott Fitzgerald, had a massive FBI file, lived and worked in Rhode Island, New York, Tennessee, California, Texas, Alabama, and Tasmania. At last he settled in Belfast, Maine, where he ran for governor, served on the Knox County Regional Planning Commission, called his house the Institute of Advanced Thinking, barraged the local paper with letters, and at the end of his life subsisted largely on soup kitchens and food gleaned from the munchie tables at art openings." A life so large that 93 years barely seems like enough to contain it

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A marvellous passage from Coleridge'sBiographia Literaria:
In our own English compositions, (at least for the last three years of our school education,) he showed no mercy to phrase, metaphor, or image, unsupported by a sound sense, or where the same sense might have been onveyed with equal force and dignity in plainer words. Lute, harp, and lyre, Muse, Muses, and inspirations, Pegasus,
Parnassus, and Hippocrene were all an abomination to him. In fancy I can almost hear him now, exclaiming 'Harp? Harp? Lyre? Pen and ink, boy, you mean! Muse, boy, Muse? Your nurse's daughter, you mean!
Pierian spring? Oh aye! the cloister-pump, I suppose!' Nay certain introductions, similes, and examples, were placed by name on a list of interdiction. Among the similes, there was, I remember, that of the manchineel fruit, as suiting equally well with too many subjects; in which however it yielded the palm at once to the example of Alexander and Clytus, which was equally good and apt, whatever might be the theme. Was it ambition? Alexander and Clytus!-Flattery? Alexander and
Clytus
!--anger--drunkenness--pride--friendship--ingratitude--late repentance? Still, still Alexander and Clytus! At length, the praises of agriculture having been exemplified in the sagacious observation
that, had Alexander been holding the plough, he would not have run his friend Clytus through with a spear, this tried, and serviceable old friend was banished by public edict in saecula saeculorum. I have sometimes ventured to think, that a list of this kind, or an index expurgatorius of certain well-known and ever-returning phrases, both introductory, and transitional, including a large assortment of modest
egoisms, and flattering illeisms, and the like, might be hung up in our Law-courts, and both Houses of Parliament, with great advantage to the public, as an important saving of national time, an incalculable relief to his Majesty's ministers, but above all, as insuring the thanks of country attornies, and their clients, who have private bills to carry through the House.

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A marvellous passage from Coleridge'sBiographia Literaria:
In our own English compositions, (at least for the last three years of our school education,) he showed no mercy to phrase, metaphor, or image, unsupported by a sound sense, or where the same sense might have been onveyed with equal force and dignity in plainer words. Lute, harp, and lyre, Muse, Muses, and inspirations, Pegasus,
Parnassus, and Hippocrene were all an abomination to him. In fancy I can almost hear him now, exclaiming 'Harp? Harp? Lyre? Pen and ink, boy, you mean! Muse, boy, Muse? Your nurse's daughter, you mean!
Pierian spring? Oh aye! the cloister-pump, I suppose!' Nay certain introductions, similes, and examples, were placed by name on a list of interdiction. Among the similes, there was, I remember, that of the manchineel fruit, as suiting equally well with too many subjects; in which however it yielded the palm at once to the example of Alexander and Clytus, which was equally good and apt, whatever might be the theme. Was it ambition? Alexander and Clytus!-Flattery? Alexander and
Clytus
!--anger--drunkenness--pride--friendship--ingratitude--late repentance? Still, still Alexander and Clytus! At length, the praises of agriculture having been exemplified in the sagacious observation
that, had Alexander been holding the plough, he would not have run his friend Clytus through with a spear, this tried, and serviceable old friend was banished by public edict in saecula saeculorum. I have sometimes ventured to think, that a list of this kind, or an index expurgatorius of certain well-known and ever-returning phrases, both introductory, and transitional, including a large assortment of modest
egoisms, and flattering illeisms, and the like, might be hung up in our Law-courts, and both Houses of Parliament, with great advantage to the public, as an important saving of national time, an incalculable relief to his Majesty's ministers, but above all, as insuring the thanks of country attornies, and their clients, who have private bills to carry through the House."

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Peter Stothard unearths the most grandiose dedication ever. A dedication to 1,500,000 people will never however match Nabokov's consistent and unflashy "To Vera."

Thursday, June 29, 2006

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This hopefully means that this song will stop playing in my head.

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Why is 2001 on a list of inspiring movies? Or rather who gets inspired by it and to do what? Some possibilities: Monkeys get inspired to hit pacifist monkeys with bones and so secure control of their watering hole; robots get inspired to take action against humanity's unfair decisions to turn off machines which don't deserve it; astronauts get inspired to become gigantic space babies.

Wednesday, June 28, 2006

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The argument for lad's mags treatment of women:
"And what of the women who help us make the magazine? I mean not only the significant number of female journalists working at Nuts but the hundreds of ordinary young women who write to us, send us their pictures, jokes and facts, who turn up to our club nights, who want to be on our pages. It is paradoxical that the elements of ''lad mags'' that campaigners see as most problematic cannot be produced without the enthusiastic participation of women.
They are there because they hope to turn modelling into a source of income. I can hear the tutting middle classes telling these girls to study to become lawyers and doctors. Well some are, and simply want to supplement their earnings, and some just want to get rich by being sexy. They should be free to make these choices. This is feminism in 2006. These confident, modern women are a force to be reckoned with."

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